Apr 16 - Jun 25, 2022 Douglas family art centre

One is Part of the Whole

Ivan Eyre, Untitled, 1981, Crayon on paper, 75.7 x 53.1 cm, Collection of the Pavilion, Assiniboine Park Conservancy

Pippi Johnson, Time Together, 2022, Image transfer and mixed media on paper, 30.5 x 30.5 cm, Collection of the artist.

“Teaching is not a profession; it’s a passion.”

– John F. Podojil

Every student, past or present, remembers their favourite teachers even decades after graduation. What makes these teachers so memorable? Simply put, it is a passion for both the subject being taught and for the act of teaching itself. When a teacher loves what they do, it shows and their passion has a tendency to rub off on their students, inspiring them with an unquenchable thirst for knowledge.

“Love what you teach, and they will love it too.”

– Sandra Scheier

From 1968 through 1998, Pippi Johnson worked as a teacher in the Visual Arts Departments of Lakewood Secondary School and Beaver Brae Secondary School in Kenora. During that time, Johnson shared her infectious passion for art with her students and nurtured their creativity. She instilled in her students a lifelong appreciation of art. Post-retirement, Pippi has continued to teach art workshops, although her main focus has become her own artistic pursuits.

“Many of my students made a career in the arts or made
the making of visual art a significant part of their lives.”

– Pippi Johnson

One is Part of the Whole is a celebration of the life and work of artist and retired art educator Pippi Johnson, and of the students she taught and inspired throughout her career. A selection of her work is shown alongside the work of 30 of her former students. The display includes artwork in a diverse range of artistic media including: painting, drawing, ceramics, performance, photography, film-making, jewelry design, wood-carving, and even cookie decorating. One passionate teacher, many inspired students!

Did you know?

Kenora’s Huskie the Muskie was built as a special roadside attraction during the building of the Trans-Canada Highway in the 1960s.  The name Huskie was chosen because it was submitted with a slogan: Huskie the Muskie says, “prevent water pollution”

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